MY PAINTING TABLE

I’ve always found it intriguing to see others’ work areas and thought, for kicks, why not show off mine?

PICTURE #1

Picture #1

At the edge of my table is the tupperware drawer tower where I store all my loose miniatures, bitz, bases and products that have been opened. On my desk is another smaller tupperware drawer set that holds all my more fiddly bitz , as well as all the tubs of GW’s resin basing accessories I’ve bought in the past. Beside that is my reference library of the last 24 months of White Dwarf (side note: the GW mail-order boxes on top of the main drawer tower are full of White Dwarfs).

I’ve got a pretty good set up for storing the myriad paints I own: I use a low bookshelf I’ve been carting around since I was four years old; the lower level holds my paints, the upper level holds tools, brushes and projects on the go. The depth of the book shelf is shallow enough that it easily fits on even a fold-up banquet table with just enough room left over for a workspace: you can see the plastic sheet I use as my palette.

PICTURE #2

Picture #2

You can see more paints and half-finished projects scattered about; a selection of oft-used brushes lies to the left. Dominant features / items: cups of paint water (one–dirty–for cleaning brushes, the other–clean–is used only for diluting paints and making washes), both bought on trips abroad: the larger one is a Bugs Bunny pewter cup bought from the Warner Brothers store on a trip to Gen Con back in the nineties, when it was still held in Milwaukie; the other smaller one is another tin cup bought in a tourist shop in Old San Diego a few years ago when I went to the San Diego’s Comic-Con. The other dominant item is the old MDF Games Workshop painting station. I bought it back when I still worked for GW–though it serves well with my multilevel set up, the thing was grossly overpriced–$45 back in 2003. I shouldn’t dis it too much; it’s served me well; but I just can’t help feeling that for every person who bought it and was satisfied there was another five or six people who felt ripped off.

Also visible in the photo is my ammunition case which also serves as a carrying case for my old Epic Eldar titans, HO-scale Heavy Gears, and I think an old Zoat (!) for those that can remember what those are. Up top are some awards I’ve won from past tournaments run in town (three for a Warpstone painting competition and one for best-painted army for my Eldar force). And, of course, tools, loose figures, projects half finished and projects barely started and general miniatuers-painting detritus litter the whole area.

PICTURE #3

Picture #3

More of the same from picture #2, really. You can see more half-started / half-finished projects: Chaos knights, Dire Avenger Exarchs, Venerable Dreadnought and Empire Gun emplacement to point out a few.The ‘Olivieri’ container in the foreground is used to hold my snow flock. In the clear plastic containers just behind that are two Gear squads for the Heavy Gear game, and in the loose see-through plastic baggy (between the water cups and the snow flock tub)  is a prototype Gear model: cast in resin, it’s every body component separated so that one could model the Gear in any pose desired–so cool!

And that wraps up my painting space. Now that I look at it, I think it’s pretty amazing that I get any projects finished! Luckily, the place I’m renting right now includes an office with built in desks (!) that have helped me be better organised, so this painting table is a step up from what I’ve had before now. In past incarnations, my painting table has been more cramped and unkempt…if you can imagine that.

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2 Responses to Painting Spaces

  1. Alem says:

    I wish I had a work table! I’m using the tiny space on my computer desk!

  2. imaginarywars says:

    I’ve always tried to spoil myself and have a dedicated painting table–back in my apartment we even sacrificed our kitchen table’s spot so that I could have a painting table (it helped that our table was bigger than the space the apartment was allotted as an eating space).

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